Note: This guest post is by Brian S. Goodman. Brian is a partner at the Baltimore law firm of Goodman & Donohue, LLC. He is also General Counsel to NAPIA.

As a guest blogger for Chip Merlin, I am honored to write a bit about the history and purpose of the National Association of Public Insurance Adjusters (NAPIA), an organization for which I have served as General Counsel for over two decades.
Continue Reading The History of NAPIA and Its Importance to the Public Adjusting Profession

Last week, the Palm Beach Post ran a story that indicated Rick Scott thought national windstorm insurance might be the answer to Florida’s looming insurance crisis. Eliot Kleinberg wrote:

Many Florida homeowners live in fear of losing their windstorm insurance. Gov. Rick Scott suggested today that windstorm coverage go the way of flood insurance and become nationalized.

"It would make a lot of sense," Scott said at a start-of-the-season news conference at the National Hurricane Center in Miami-Dade County.


Continue Reading And the Insurance Industry Comes Out Swinging

On April 4, Doctors Philip J. Klotzbach and William M. Gray, of Colorado State University’s Tropical Meteorlogy Project, released their Extended Range Forecast of Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Activity and Landfall Strike Probability for 2012. In summary, they predict:

Continue Reading Meteorologists Predict 2012 Will Be A Relatively Mild Hurricane Season for the Atlantic Basin

The issue of whether the 2005 Florida Statute sections 627.7065, 627 .7072, and 627.7073 (2005), which affected sinkhole database information, testing standards, and reporting requirements, created a presumption that shifted the burden of proof to the homeowner in litigation to disprove an insurer’s expert’s opinion that damage was not caused by a sinkhole has been in question for several years. Last month, the Florida Supreme Court definitively held the statutes do not create a presumption in litigation.

Continue Reading Florida Supreme Court Holds that the Presumption Favoring Insurers Created in Florida Statute 627.7073(1)(c) (2005) Does Not Apply in Litigation

Property Casualty 360 posted a story by the Associated Press, describing the continuing saga of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corporations’ Hurricane Rita and Katrina claims.

Continue Reading With $100 Million on the Line, Louisiana’s State Run Insurer of Last Resort is Turning to the U.S. Supreme Court

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is facing a September 30th deadline. That is the date the temporary extension runs out on the Flood Program. Unless a bill that reauthorizes the program passes, the NFIP could expire. But this week, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 1309 (The Flood Insurance Reform Act) by an overwhelming majority.

Continue Reading National Flood Insurance Program Legislation Moves Forward

Contingent Business Interruption coverage is usually an extension of the business interruption coverage available in most commercial property policies. It provides the insured with benefits to cover lost profits and extra expenses resulting from damage to a third party’s property.  In today’s integrated business world, most businesses are highly dependant upon others for product, sales, and even customers.  As businesses globalize, they become vulnerable to disasters across the globe.  Even now, many businesses are waiting to realize the extent of the contingent business loss that will result from the tsunami and nuclear disasters in Japan.

Continue Reading The Japan Tsunami and Contingent Business Interruption Coverage