In Florida, There Are Penalties For An Insurance Company That Does Not Timely Issue Payment After A Settlement

An overwhelming number of claims are settled on a mutual understanding with respect to the covered loss and the amount necessary to indemnify the policyholder. The question is then: What can a policyholder do if the insurance company is taking an unreasonable amount of time to tender settlement payment. Florida law remains focused on strong public policy encouraging settlement of claims. To accomplish that goal Florida legislature has implemented statutes to protect the policyholders even when an amicable resolution has been reached between the policyholder and the insurance company. Continue Reading

NFIP Authorization Extended Until May 31, 2019, But Flood Program Could Be Disrupted By Government Shutdown

I recently wrote about the short-term extension that halted the potential expiration of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) set for November 30, 2018. Following that post, the NFIP was extended by Congress until December 21, 2018, and a lapse was averted. Continue Reading

Period of Restoration – Should the time to adjust the claim be considered? Part II

The effort to mitigate the damage, gather supporting documents, and present an insurance claim, can for many policyholders prove to be the toughest part of the recovery process. After suffering a loss or business interruption, the main priority of most business owners is restoring their businesses or premises as soon as possible – not preparing an insurance claim. While their goal is to achieve the utmost recovery in the shortest period of time, the loss adjustment process can be long and grueling. Continue Reading

Insurance Company’s Long Duration of Negotiations and Stalling Tactics Supports Plaintiff’s Claim for “Bad Faith”

Illinois’ solution to an insurance company’s delay, deny and defend tactics is section 155 of the Illinois Insurance Code, which provides an extra-contractual remedy to policyholders whose insurer’s refusal to recognize liability and pay a claim under a policy is vexatious and unreasonable.1 Section 155 of the Code is intended to aid the insured and to discourage insurers from profiting by their superior financial positions while delaying in the payment of contractual obligations.2 Continue Reading

Flood Insurance for Commercial Properties

After every major flood event, I am contacted by at least one business owner and/or condominium owner who suffered flood damage, filed their claim with their NFIP1 Flood Insurance Company (Allstate, Hartford, Wright Flood, Farmers, FEMA, etc.), and was then told by either the flood insurance company or adjuster that the flood insurance policy did not cover all of the buildings or structures on the property. The business owners are enraged because they were under the impression that all buildings on the property were covered. Continue Reading

Statutory Interest Series: Colorado

In two recent blog posts, I discussed Florida statutory interest which imposes a statutory duty on insurance carriers to pay interest on delayed payment of insurance proceeds.1 If you missed either blog post, then you find them here:

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‘Tis The Season—Do You Need Special Event Insurance?

Plans for the holiday season and especially for the big blowout bash of January 1st are, no doubt, well underway with arrangements having been made for the location, caterer, band, and invitations, but has any thought been given to the purchase of special event insurance? Probably not. Insurance is usually an afterthought if any thought is given to it at all. Special event insurance can be purchased for both private and corporate events.1 The following is a snapshot of special event insurance for private events just in case there is a planned January 1st festivity—it’s not too late to purchase special event insurance. Continue Reading

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