Insurance estimators, appraisers, and adjusters of roofing claims should read the attached partial specifications of a commercial roofing project. There has been some discussion of what a “reasonable” cost should be, but I think most would require that the scope of a commercial roofing job involving insurance be one that is going to result in a “quality” job. So, how do you determine what a quality commercial roofing job would be? I suggest you would look at specifications that the construction industry has come up with to prevent non-quality work from occurring.

Where do you find the specifications for quality construction? The Construction Specifications Institute.

The Construction Specifications Institute is a national non-profit technical organization dedicated to the improvement of specifications and building practices in the construction industry through service, education, and research. Founded in 1948, CSI provides a forum for architects, engineers, designers, specification writers, contractors, manufacturer’s representatives, suppliers, and all others in the construction industry. Membership is open to all who are involved in the built environment.

Historically, the CSI helped ensure quality construction through standards of materials and methods of construction. I would encourage anybody who is in the insurance restoration business, as a restoration contractor or an individual who is somehow responsible for determining the scope of methods and materials to be used in a particular restoration project, to become intimately familiar with using the reference materials available from the CSI. I would also suggest that you contemplate obtaining certification from the Construction Specifications Institute as well.

Thought For The Day

Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.
—George Washington

  • Bruce Holmes

    Amen! FL has pretty good FBC standards and NOA process for roofing materials and components. The real thing lacking is that contracts roofers offer for work are woefully lacking in explanation and substance. Roofing industry (and clients) would benefit greatly from some kind of standard contract, IMHO.