Policyholders are human and social media has really become a way of life for the young and those in their golden years.

Not surprisingly, homeowners and business owners suffering a loss, post about their problems on social media. But consider this: insurance companies are using information gathered from your social media profiles to look for ways to gain information they can turn into a red flag or a reason to delay or deny your claim.

Even if you don’t post one thing about your loss, you may still be under fire by your insurance adjuster about posts placed put on the Internet before you ever even had a problem.

When insurance companies are questioning insureds in a recorded statement, during an initial claim intake or interview, or at examinations under oath, they have already done a detailed evaluation into your public profiles.

To really grasp the power and the magnitude of how posting rants and photos can affect your insurance claim, you would really need to be a fly on the wall in the offices of the carriers.

The powers that be that are denying and delaying the claim are judging your character. Even if the claim has nothing to do with you personally, even if liability and responsibility is clear, the carriers are judging you.

What would an insurance company be looking at on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn accounts that have nothing to do with your current claim? Here is the short, non-inclusive list

  • Information on the risk location or about your home, business or life prior to the loss
  • Posts about the condition of the property, complaints or brags
  • Complaints about your property having problems before the loss
  • Complaints or brags about people or companies servicing your home
  • Posts about the staff persons in your business and their areas of expertise
  • Posts about purchase or inheritance of items
  • Posts about marital trouble
  • Posts about financial trouble
  • Your vacation photos
  • Posts about spending money on things perceived to be an extra or an unnecessary item
  • “Check in’s” at various locations, shows your whereabouts, habits and gives some insight into your spending.
  • Posts about offering the property for sale. (Note: This matters even if you never sell. The asking price and reductions of the asking price will be reviewed with great detail.
  • Posts about offering inventory or personal items for sale. (Note: this matter even if you never find a buyer)
  • Posts about bad weather in your area
  • Posts about arguments with the family
  • Posts about mergers with companies

You never know when you are going to suffer a sudden and accidental loss, but keep your eyes open and understand what “research” is happening on the mobile device of the adjuster before they step foot on the property. You can’t un-ring the bell.

  • Gary Rowland

    Or bell. But all is true. Also they do this background check on social media prior to employment. Thanks for the heads up.
    Gary R

  • Wilbert Gomez

    Good morning Mr. Merlin

    Home is where your heart is!
    So now the Denied Delay Defend Rule is initially applied to the claim using the policy holder heart.
    When the insurer representative start watching, taking pictures etc. of the non claimed portion of the risk or start digging on insurers personal Facebook page ,etc. is that considered invasion of Privacy?
    When all of us voluntarily applied for the claims adjuster license , we agreed to be impartial, we agreed to be fair, to adjust the claims in good faith, and more.
    If you start watching clients Facebook page to find facts to denied the claim you are not a good adjuster, you became an independent contractor/mercenary willing to do what ever needs to be done to deny claims and help carriers CEOs to have salaries above $ 5,000000.0 per year……

  • Roger Poe

    Excellent post Nichole. Conversely – Social media also candidly exposes certain insurers and their “adjusters” ongoing and illicit market practices.

    And all that that means..