Rimkus Consulting Group

The post from this morning, Internal Texas Windstorm Roofing Claims Memo Explains Damage is Not Covered, raised a number of interesting methods to research this coverage issue. Many risk managers and public adjusters will simply call me to get a quick opinion regarding many day to day coverage issues. I thought it might be interesting to see what adjusters may have in their basic training materials to answer the questions raised in the memo. I have no idea if the TWIA claims executives looked at any reference materials. I hope they authored the claims memo in ignorance, because the opposite poses a different set of problems.


Continue Reading The TWIA Roof Damage Memo: Checking Basic References to Resolve Adjustment Questions

Mark Phillips recently posted a comment in Surplus Lines Insurers, Sinkholes, and the Law of Mars, which would probably terminate his employment as an adjuster for telling the truth if he were still an Independent Adjuster:

"I handled numerous loss adjustments for a South Florida MGA broker who had arranged his own "excess surplus lines" authority overseas. Due to this flexible "hand-shake" authority and with his own customized and approved manuscripted policy designs, he was actually controlling the underwriting data and policy issuance. He was bold and daring enough to "check off" certain boxes misrepresenting building characteristics and histories inaccurately on applications, so that, at time of loss investigation he could promptly deny coverage when it was noted in the adjusting routine that certain building events and maintenances had not occurred as were required to be validated in order to acquire the policy coverage and issuance. He could thus accurately void the contract on grounds of misrepresentation, and have the underwriting questionnaire in the file to back up the denial. His incentive was of course to sustain his flexible contract arrangement and limit his loss ratios, thus enriching his commission contingencies. Worth noting is that many of the insureds represented a class of Hispanic consumers who had no ability to know what was authentically being stated on their final application and were thus caught by surprise when struggling to communicate in English, back to me the adjuster, that they had not confirmed certain property realities that had been "checked off" on their application.

Another compromised policyholder left at the curb." 


Continue Reading The Insurance Adjuster’s Dilemma: Tell the Truth and Face the Consequences By Raising Claim Practice Misconduct

Surplus lines insurance companies are a different breed of insurance cat. They are not admitted carriers in the state in which they do business. Thus, most states have consumer protection laws specifically regarding how surplus lines insurance carriers can do business.

Surplus lines carriers are very important to the insurance marketplace. They will often insure the risks many admitted carriers find too risky or novel. For example, when a property owner buys surplus flood insurance or a complex Difference in Conditions policy, it is often sold through the surplus lines market.


Continue Reading Surplus Lines Insurers, Sinkholes, and the Law of Mars

Our firm has friends in the insurance industry and other sources of information who have privately provided evidence of wrongdoing by insurance companies. On more than one occasion, documents evidencing wrongful insurance claims conduct have appeared on my front door or in unmarked mail with anonymous notes asking that the information be disseminated. Sometimes, the proof of the current secret claims warfare against policyholders is provided to us by the insurance industry itself. We received such proof last week in an email.


Continue Reading Insurance Company Experts Are Often Biased And Outcome Oriented