Tag Archives: Proof of Loss

Proof of Loss: Can an Insurer Deny Coverage and Later Argue the Claim is Barred Because the Insured Did Not Comply with the Proof of Loss Condition?

Insurers on occasion deny coverage or make claim decisions based on one ground, and then later, during litigation, seek to avoid liability based upon an entirely new defense theory. Although coverage decision letters regularly throw in boilerplate language seeking to avoid waiving coverage defenses, I was recently asked whether an insurer can deny coverage or … Continue Reading

Where Do I Mail the Signed NFIP Proof of Loss?

At the Florida Association of Public Insurance Adjusters (FAPIA) Fall Conference last week, I was speaking with a public adjuster about the impeding 60-day deadline for his clients to submit their signed, sworn, proofs of loss for Hurricane Matthew flood claims. For public adjusters who have not handled many flood claims in the past, this … Continue Reading

Hurricane Matthew Updates Via Email

If you or your clients have suffered a flood loss, it is critical that the proof of loss is properly filled out and promptly submitted. In recent seminars, Chip Merlin has addressed Hurricane Matthew damages caused by both wind and flood. In the seminars he specifically details how handling flood losses differ greatly from handling … Continue Reading

Flood Property Damage Tools for Owners and Adjusters

2016 has been year of unprecedented floods in many areas of the Southeast. Many who thought there were on high ground in places like Baton Rouge, Louisiana, or Fayetteville, North Carolina, are still trying to comprehend the devastation of the flooding from August and October in their retrospective states. Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina residents … Continue Reading

Proof of Loss and the “Prejudice” Rule – Arizona Coverage Series

In my prior blogs on Arizona insurance law, I discussed how insurance companies cannot simply get off the hook if a policyholder submits a claim late or files a lawsuit after the statute of limitations has expired. In those instances, an insurance company cannot avoid accepting or paying a claim (assuming there is coverage) unless … Continue Reading
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