Edward Eshoo

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Does a Residence Restriction Violate the Standard Fire Insurance Policy?

Homeowner property insurance policies usually cover the dwelling located at the “residence premises,” which is typically defined as the one, two, three, or four-family dwelling used principally as a private residence and where the insured resides. What happens if the insured is not residing in the dwelling at the time of a fire loss? Is … Continue Reading

Is a “Matching” Dispute Appropriate for Appraisal?

In my last blog post, I discussed Windridge of Naperville Condominium Association v. Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company,1 and the issue whether appraisal is appropriate to resolve a dispute over the need for a general contractor to perform repairs following a covered loss. Windridge of Naperville also involved whether appraisal is appropriate to resolve a dispute … Continue Reading

Is a Dispute Over General Contractor Overhead and Profit Appropriate for Appraisal?

In Windridge of Naperville Condominium Association v. Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company,1 a federal district court in Illinois recently addressed the issue whether appraisal is appropriate to resolve a dispute over the need for a general contractor to perform repairs following a covered loss. There, hail damaged townhome buildings, requiring repairs. Philadelphia paid for losses it … Continue Reading

What Constitutes Enforcement of a Building Ordinance or Law?

“Ordinance or law” property insurance coverage is typically triggered when, following a covered loss to a covered building, an insured incurs certain costs due to the enforcement of an ordinance or law1 requiring or regulating the demolition, construction, or repair of buildings.2 What does enforcement mean for purposes of triggering building ordinance or law coverage? … Continue Reading

Age as a Factor in Determining Depreciation Used to Calulate Actual Cash Value

In Lains v. American Family Mutual Insurance Company,1 a federal district court in Washington considered two issues involving actual cash value: whether American Family improperly considered age in depreciating the insureds’ personal property loss, and whether American Family improperly depreciated labor costs as applied to the insureds’ dwelling loss. The American Family policy defined “actual … Continue Reading

Using a Motion in Limine to Exclude Evidence of Prior Fires or Prior Insurance Claims

Motions in limine are commonly used to seek a pre-trial ruling regarding excluding inadmissible or prejudicial evidence. At the federal level, Federal Rules of Evidence (“FRE”) 103(d) and 104(c),1 402,2 403,3 and 611(a)4 and Federal Rule of Civil Procedure (“FRCP”) 16(c)5 provide the underlying bases for in limine motions, though the power to rule on … Continue Reading

The Neglect Exclusion Does Not Apply to Pre-Loss Neglect

Homeowner and commercial property insurance policies typically exclude loss or damage caused by or resulting from neglect.1 Under the ISO Homeowners 3-Special Form,2 neglect means “neglect of an ‘insured’ to use all reasonable means to save and preserve property at and after the time of a loss.” Under the ISO Commercial Property Causes of Loss-Special … Continue Reading

Illinois Courts Follow the “Prevention of Performance” Doctrine

Homeowner and commercial property insurance policies typically limit an insured’s recovery to actual cash value1 benefits unless and until the damaged or destroyed property is repaired or replaced. This limitation becomes an issue if coverage is declined and the insurer fails to pay actual cash value benefits as “seed money” to start the repair/replacement process. … Continue Reading

When Does Business Personal Property Become Personal Property?

Although they typically insure personal property owned or used by insureds while it is anywhere in the world, most homeowner insurance policies contain a special limitation of liability for “business” personal property. For example, under the 2011 edition of the ISO Homeowners 3-Special Form, property on the residence premises used primarily for business purposes is … Continue Reading
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