Last month the Assistant Administrator for Insurance, Paul Huang, extended the deadline for submitting a Proof of Loss for flood insurance claims. The Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP) provides that a proof of loss must be submitted within 60 days of the loss. However, FEMA Bulletin W-18026 waived the 60-day proof of loss deadline, extending the deadline to submit a proof of loss to 365 days (one year) from the date of loss:
Continue Reading Hurricane Michael Flood Proof of Loss Extension

If your home or business was damaged by flood waters from Hurricane Irma and you had flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) the deadline to submit a proof of loss is quickly approaching. The Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP) provides that a proof of loss must be submitted within 60 days of the loss. However, FEMA Bulletin W-17040 waived the 60-day proof of loss deadline, extending the deadline to submit a proof of loss to 365 days (one year) from the date of loss.
Continue Reading Hurricane Irma NFIP Proof of Loss Deadline is Quickly Approaching

Many Texans will lose their right to additional flood insurance money that they’re entitled to – this situation is urgent. The most important deadline for Texans with Hurricane Harvey flood damage is quickly approaching – it’s only one month away on the anniversary of Harvey – and Texans largely have no clue.
Continue Reading Hurricane Harvey Critical Flood Deadline in One Month – Texans Have Not Been Made Aware!

One certain way FEMA and National Flood Administrators get out of paying otherwise valid flood insurance claims is to require strict and timely requirements. Citing an internally generated and fraudulent 99% closure statistic, the National Flood Program denied a request to extend the timeline for filing Proofs of Loss for Hurricane Harvey, Irma, and Maria victims.
Continue Reading National Flood Administrator Says “Hell No, No More Extensions” To Harvey, Irma and Maria Flood Victims

As advocates for victims whose lives have been turned upside down as a result of the devastating flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma, and Hurricane Maria, we know that one year may not be enough time for flood victims to obtain the estimates and documents necessary to submit their required proof of loss form to FEMA or their flood insurance company.
Continue Reading Merlin Law Group Asks FEMA to Extend the Proof of Loss Deadline for Victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria

Although we are over 5 years past Hurricane Sandy, flood insurance coverage issues are still being litigated. I previously wrote about a decision out of the U.S. District Court of the District of New Jersey, Migliaro v. Fidelity National Indemnity Insurance Company.1
Continue Reading What Constitutes a “written denial of all or part of the claim” in Federal Flood Claims?

Beginning on August 9, 2016 and lasting through August 31, 2016, numerous parishes in Southeast Louisiana1 experienced prolonged, torrential rainfall and flooding. By the end of the days-long Great Flood event of 2016, several states were included in disaster declarations due to the same weather system. Though flooding to this extent is usually associated with a hurricane or tropical storm, this one was not. Regardless, flood damage is often covered by a Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP) issued through National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) fiscal agents known as Write Your Own (WYO) companies or by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) directly through an NFIP Direct Servicing Agent (Direct). The NFIP is provided under the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, amended (NFIA)2 and the SFIP is regulated under 44 C.F.R. §§ 61 and 62.
Continue Reading Flood Related Deadlines Nearing for Louisiana 2016 Mid-Summer Severe Storms: Proof of Loss Deadline v. Lawsuit Deadline

The purpose of a sworn proof of loss is to enable the insurer to properly investigate the circumstances of a loss while the occurrence is fresh in the minds of the witnesses, to prevent fraud, and to enable it to form an intelligent estimate of its rights and liabilities so it may adequately prepare to defend any claim. But, if that information is not submitted in the form requested by the insurance company, has an insured still complied with the proof of loss requirement?
Continue Reading Is Substantial Compliance with a Proof of Loss Enough?