In a recent op-ed article published in the Star Ledger, Rutgers Law Professor Jay Feinman debunked the myth that insurance companies have been using for decades to prevent good faith claims handling bills from passing through the legislature. As Feinman noted, insurance companies argue that the Insurance Fair Conduct Act (IFCA) is unnecessary and would be harmful, suggesting the bill would dramatically raise insurance premiums.
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Recently, the New Jersey Senate passed S-2144, entitled the New Jersey Insurance Fair Conduct Act. While the bill still must go through the Assembly and be signed by the Governor, this is much welcomed news by insureds and their representatives. Since 1993, insureds have had basically no right to bad faith claims against their insurers under the blanket of the Picket v. Lloyd “fairly debatable” standard.1
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Accord and satisfaction are legal terms frequently used in insurance contract dispute and often included in any insurance carrier’s Answer and Affirmative Defenses to any complaint filed. An agreement (accord) between two contracting parties to accept alternate performance to discharge a preexisting duty between them and the subsequent performance (satisfaction) of that agreement.
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Please join the Professional Public Adjusters Association of New Jersey (PPAANJ) at its Fall Meeting on November 15, 2017, at the Molly Pitcher Inn in Red Bank, New Jersey. Continuing Education credits will be provided for New Jersey, New York & Pennsylvania.

PPAANJ is pleased to announce that Mr. Joseph A. McDougal, Manager Licensing and Insurance Education, Consumer Protection Services, New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance, will be a special guest speaker. Mr. McDougal will discuss continuing education for New Jersey public insurance adjusters and be open to questions from the membership. Don’t miss this opportunity to meet Mr. McDougal and discuss our continuing education requirements.
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If your home or business is affected by a disaster and you have purchased property damage insurance, you may immediately feel a sign of relief. That relief could be fleeting, upon a discovery that the promptly submitted insurance claim has been denied. Immediately you realize there are statutes and regulations that protect consumers from wrongful denials. Unfortunately, the level of protection will depend on the which of the fifty states your property is located. The insurance industry is regulated by each state, so the protections afforded by law can vary distinctly from state to state.
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