National Flood Program

Hurricane Michael has left a familiar mark on the Florida Panhandle. Much like Hurricanes Katrina and Ike, Hurricane Michael brought devasting winds followed by wind and flooding and more wind. Battered homes and businesses are assessed in the aftermath in an attempt to determine the extent and cause of damage resulting from the multiple perils associated with a hurricane. This has proven to be no easy task after a major hurricane.
Continue Reading Substantial Damage, Substantial Structural Damage, Wind Damage, Flood Damage…. Damage Anyway!

This year I’ve been privileged with the opportunity to attend the 2019 National Flood Conference in Washington D.C. The National Flood Conference is a three-day annual event for flood insurance industry professionals, and various other professionals whose industries overlap in some way with flood insurance (think mortgage lenders, insurance agents, mold remediators, attorneys, etc.). Over the course of the next few days I will provide day-by-day recaps of my experience at the National Flood Conference with my thoughts, opinions, and interesting things I’ve learned.
Continue Reading National Flood Conference – An Insider’s Perspective of Day 1

It’s been almost seven years since Superstorm Sandy hit New Jersey and Sandy cases are still wending through New Jersey Courts. A recent Third Circuit Court of Appeals decision discusses the importance of a properly completed proof of loss when submitting a flood claim under a Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP).1
Continue Reading Flood Proof of Loss Filled Correctly? Do not lose benefits by failing to list amount claimed

I grew up in a United States Coast Guard family. One of the fondest two years of my life was when my father was stationed on the USCG Dependable and we lived in Panama City, Florida. I sailed in every nook and lagoon of St. Andrews Bay and raced sailboats like my life’s existence depended upon me winning races.
Continue Reading Hurricane Michael Brings Back Memories of Living in Panama City, Florida, and a Tip About Damaged Photograph Claims

In my last two posts I wrote about the threatened expiration of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and stop-gap legislation that averted the lapse. NFIP’s authorization to operate is now extended to May 31, 2019. Despite the reauthorization legislation, FEMA announced it would halt NFIP’s authority to issue new and renewal flood policies until the full government reopens, citing the partial shut-down and lapse in appropriations.
Continue Reading FEMA Backtracks, Advises That Partial Federal Government Shutdown Will Not Disrupt Flood Insurance Program

I recently wrote about the short-term extension that halted the potential expiration of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) set for November 30, 2018. Following that post, the NFIP was extended by Congress until December 21, 2018, and a lapse was averted.
Continue Reading NFIP Authorization Extended Until May 31, 2019, But Flood Program Could Be Disrupted By Government Shutdown

After every major flood event, I am contacted by at least one business owner and/or condominium owner who suffered flood damage, filed their claim with their NFIP1 Flood Insurance Company (Allstate, Hartford, Wright Flood, Farmers, FEMA, etc.), and was then told by either the flood insurance company or adjuster that the flood insurance policy did not cover all of the buildings or structures on the property. The business owners are enraged because they were under the impression that all buildings on the property were covered.
Continue Reading Flood Insurance for Commercial Properties

When a National Flood Insurance Program (“NFIP”) insured is not satisfied with the payment for flood-related losses, the NFIP insured is directed to three options:1

  1. The NFIP insured may file an appeal with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (“FEMA”) within 60 days of the NFIP insurer’s written denial or partial denial of the requested claim amount.2
  2. The NFIP insured can invoke the Appraisal Provision of her policy. NOTE: The NFIP insured may not file option one above, the appeal with FEMA, if the Appraisal Provision is invoked.
  3. The NFIP insured may file a lawsuit within one year of the date of the written denial of all or part of the NFIP insured’s claim. NOTE: The filing of a lawsuit precludes option one, the appeal, and option two, the appraisal process, as those are considered pre-litigation administrative remedies.
    Continue Reading NFIP’S Horseshoe Option