Mississippi Department of Insurance

On August 17, 2018, the 49th anniversary of Hurricane Camille, the benchmark in Mississippi for devastation and survivability prior to the impact of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the Mississippi Insurance Department (“MID”) filed its adoption of Rule 34.11 to amend the Mississippi Homeowner Insurance Policyholder Bill of Rights (“Policyholder Bill of Rights”) to include an Outline of Coverage and Comprehensive Policyholder Checklist.1
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Amy Bach and others with United Policyholders provide a longtime and steadfast consumer protection organization devoted solely to the interests of policyholders. With extensive experience and appreciation of how much legislation can impact insurance coverage and claims, Bach provides a unique perspective with expertise on a national level concerning insurance policy and insurance regulation. Policyholders need more Amy Bachs to counteract the extraordinary coordinated efforts by insurers to make laws and regulations one sided in the insurers favor.


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Mississippi State Senator David Baria admitted that his proposed legislative bill of rights for policyholders is “dead.” Mississippi S.B. 2196 would have eliminated anticoncurrent causation exclusionary language from property insurance policies. The Mississippi Senate Insurance Committee failed to act on the bill, thereby killing any attempt to enact a bill of rights.

Unlike other states,

The Mississippi Department of Insurance finally issued its report regarding State Farm’s claims handling following Hurricane Katrina. The findings were long and will undoubtedly be subject to criticism and interpretation. I am certain State Farm publicists will try to undermine the Rigsby sisters’ claims even more since the report essentially concluded that their assertions were unsubstantiated. State Farm will also point to the findings that no penalties were warranted. Those same State Farm publicists will NOT point out that the investigation found State Farm employees were not forthright in their interviews. State Farm attorneys will certainly not tell judges or others that State Farm employees had various and contradictory explanations as to what the anti-concurrent language means and how it worked in the adjustment of claims in Mississippi.

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