In an historic win for American consumers and workers, on September 20, 2019, the U. S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1423, the Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal or FAIR Act,1 by a vote of 225 to 186. This groundbreaking bill could be the beginning of the demise of the remedy-stripping, rights-stomping, forced arbitration clauses in contracts of adhesion. Arbitration is often referred to an alternative dispute resolution—meaning an alternative to the litigation of a dispute.
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A recent Southern District of Florida decision addressed this issue.1

A property in Islamorada, Florida, which was owned by the estate of Raymond K. Hampson, was damaged by Hurricane Irma in September 2017. The personal representative for the estate, Timothy R. Hampson (“Hampson”) made a claim for damages under the standard flood insurance policy (“SFIP”) covering the property. When Hampson sued Wright National Flood Insurance Company, a Write Your Own (“WYO”) carrier, for breach of the insurance contract, Hampson also sought an award of attorney’s fees, costs and case expenses under the Equal Justice to Access Act (the “EAJA”), 28 U.S.C. § 2412.
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Currently, policies of insurance for flood, even if purchased through your insurance agent or normal insurance company, are Federal Flood Insurance Policies issued through the National Flood Insurance Program, if your community is participating in the NFIP. Because the program is federally subsidized, homeowners on floodplains are able to purchase the polices at rates much lower than the underlying risk. As such, the NFIP is approximately $25 billion in debt.
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It’s not an April Fools’ joke; flood insurance premiums will begin to increase today. The increased premiums are happening now as part of the Flood Insurance Relief Bill that was signed last year in response to the increased flood premiums that were being sent to policyholders under the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012.


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In my post last week, I mentioned that the National Flood Insurance Program will implement certain changes which go into effect on June 1, 2014. The changes are primarily a result of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (BW-12). The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) published a summary of the changes in WYO Bulletin W-13070, dated December 16, 2013.


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The National Flood Insurance Program will implement certain changes which go into effect on June 1, 2014. The changes are primarily as a result of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (BW-12). The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) published a summary of the changes in WYO Bulletin W-13070, dated December 16, 2013.1


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