“We hope this sentence sends a message that this conduct will not be tolerated in our county.”
—Matt Smid, Tarrant County Assistant Criminal District Attorney

According to the Tarrant County district attorney’s office, a Tarrant County judge sentenced Richard Livesay to five years in prison after he pled guilty to various charges including fraud and barratry for filing fraudulent hail claim lawsuits. Livesay reportedly would have received more than $300,000 had his fraudulent scheme not been uncovered.

First arrested in June of 2017, the Texas Department of Insurance investigators discovered Livesay had been billing insurers for fraudulent hailstorm damage to roofs without the knowledge or consent of the rightful homeowners since May 2014 and continuing through July 2016. According to Tarrant County prosecutor Matt Smid, Livesay would show up at the homes of people with roof damage, claim he was working with a roofing company and have them sign a waiver. Then, according to Smid, he would file multiple lawsuits against the insurance carriers without the homeowners ever knowing or consenting.

Pursuant to an agreed judgment with the State Bar of Texas, Livesay’s license to practice law has since been suspended for a year due to his professional misconduct. Consequences include an agreement Livesay made to pay restitution to the victims as well as testify against his former allies involved in the scheme.

As a result of the growing problem, Tarrant County is one of six places in which the Texas Department of Insurance has localized investigators and prosecutors within the district attorney’s offices to crack down on the issue.

  • shirley heflin

    Dear Ms. Wilke:

    I’m confused. Your article says Attorney Livesay was sentenced to five (5) years in prison and

    “…..Pursuant to an agreed judgment with the State Bar of Texas, Livesay’s
    license to practice law has since been suspended for a year due to his
    professional misconduct. Consequences include an agreement Livesay made
    to pay restitution to the victims as well as testify against his former
    allies involved in the scheme.”

    In my opinion, I don’t think anyone should be a licensed Attorney after committing fraud and becoming a convicted felon (one that has an imposed 5 year prison sentence at that). I guess if I’m reading between the lines here, he’s getting a break and/or immunity for testifying against others in this scheme.

    ONE WORD: GREED.

    Respectfully,
    SHIRLEY HEFLIN
    Tampa, FL

  • rogerpoe

    It would be nice if the Texas Department of Insurance would “crack down” on Insurers ongoing market fraud, against their Insureds. Surely within the “six places in which the Texas Department of Insurance has localized investigators and prosecutors within the district attorney’s offices”, they can easily find that form of Insurance Fraud.

    • something nice to wish for, but don’t hold your breath